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Watch: Driver drinks from flask AND uses mobile phone on busy city street

This is the moment a driver was recorded drinking and talking on his phone at the SAME TIME on one of Birmingham s busiest streets. The mobile phone footage was captured and posted by Twitter by a passenger in another car who could not believe what he was seeing. The driver of the Nissan car can be seen talking on his phone with his right hand and drinking from a mug with his left hand as he appears to pull away.

Watch: Driver Drinks From Flask AND Uses Mobile Phone On Busy City Street The driver appears to drink and use his phone at the same time.

The video was recorded just before 2.30pm last Tuesday in Tyburn Road, Erdington1 . The footage was later sent to West Midlands Police2 . Earlier this week a motorist suspected of playing Pokemon G3 o while driving on a busy ring road was fined by police.

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The 27-year-old was stopped for using his phone while driving in Birmingham Street, just off the ring road in Stourbridge, at about 12.30pm on Monday. In a tweet, West Midlands Police traffic officers said: Male caught Stourbridge ring road on mobile phone, we suspect Pokemon but the ticket will poke this mon into not using Pokemon GO. And earlier this year a police motorway crackdown on motorists using mobile phones at the wheel4 snared more than 130 drivers and caught out others for not wearing a seatbelt.

Officers from Central Motorway Police Group (CMPG) used an unmarked HGV cab in the three-week operation that stopped 274 vehicles, including more than 200 HGVs, on the M5, M6 and M42. There were a total of 310 offences reported, with 133 arrested for using a mobile phone and 138 for not wearing a seatbelt. Punishments for those caught included warnings, penalty notices or attending an awareness course.

References

  1. ^ Tyburn Road, Erdington (www.birminghammail.co.uk)
  2. ^ West Midlands Police (www.birminghammail.co.uk)
  3. ^ motorist suspected of playing Pokemon G (www.birminghammail.co.uk)
  4. ^ using mobile phones at the wheel (www.birminghammail.co.uk)

LG X Screen smartphone with dual display, Android Marshmallow launched at Rs 12990

NEW DELHI: LG has launched its latest X series smartphone in India. The LG X Screen is priced at Rs 12,990 the smartphone and will be exclusively available on Snapdeal.

The South Korean giant4 announced the new mid-range X series of ‘specialists’ smartphones at the Mobile World Congress 2016 in February this year. In the same month, the company also launched the X Screen smartphone in its home country Korea. LG has claimed that every smartphone in the series will boasts of a special feature. And as the name suggests, LG X screen seems to have screen as its ‘special’ feature. LG X Screen boasts of dual-display. The handset has a 4.93-inch primary display and a secondary ‘Always-on’ screen measuring 1.76-inch, similar to the one in LG’s V10. The second screen can be used to access frequently-used apps, answer calls without interrupting the current activity, check time, date, battery status and other notifications without turning on the smartphone.5

LG X Screen is powered by a 1.2GHz quad-core processor coupled with 2GB RAM, has 16GB in-built storage, houses a 2,300mAh battery and sports 13MP rear and 8MP front cameras. The smartphone measures 142.6 x 71.8 x 7.1mm and will be available in Black, White and Pink Gold colour options.

The handset runs Android 6.0 Marshmallow operating system out-of-the-box.

LG Mosquito away TV review: Keeps mosquitoes away, not the viewers8

LG recently launched its first TV having the same mosquito repellent technology in India. Dubbed Mosquito Away, the TV is priced at Rs 26,990. So is the LG Mosquito Away really capable of delivering a great TV watching experience, while at the same time keeping mosquito away? We used the TV for a few days, and here are our findings.

Recently, LG launched the Stylus Plus 2 smartphone in India priced at Rs 24,450. The handset sports a 5.7-inch Full HD IPS Quantum display with 1080×1920 pixels resolution. It is powered by a 1.4GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 processor along with Adreno 505 GPU, 3GB of RAM and 16GB of internal storage which can be further expanded up to 200GB via microSD card.
LG Stylus 2 Plus comes with a stylus pen with nano-coated tip for more accuracy compared to the previous rubber-tipped pen on LG Stylus. The Pen Pop features toggles, a pop-up menu when the stylus is removed to offer shortcuts to Pop Memo and Pop Scanner.

The device comes with a Pen Keeper to prevent the stylus from being misplaced by displaying a pop-up message when the phone is detected as being in motion when the stylus bay is empty.
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References

  1. ^ smartphone (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  2. ^ LG X Screen (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  3. ^ smartphone (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  4. ^ South Korean giant (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  5. ^ smartphone. (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  6. ^ LG X (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  7. ^ Android (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  8. ^ LG Mosquito away TV review: Keeps mosquitoes away, not the viewers (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  9. ^ Qualcomm (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  10. ^ LG Stylus 2 Plus (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)

US drug squads told to get a warrant before tracking mobile phones NY District Court stings Stingrays and tosses out …

A US federal judge in New York State has pushed back against Uncle Sam’s Drug Enforcement Agency’s use of Stingrays1, saying evidence collected by the fake phone masts isn’t admissible. A Maryland judge ruled in 20152 that investigators need court-approved warrants to set up pretend cellphone towers that track people by their mobiles. On Tuesday, US district court judge William Pauley III, sitting in New York, came to the same conclusion, declaring that the Stingray technology can’t be used to subvert America’s Fourth Amendment. His judgment, here3, draws parallels with other cases that have treated privacy-invasive technologies as unreasonable search. Past rulings on such matters have kiboshed heat detection through walls, for example, in the 15-year-old Kyllo4 case that began in 1992.

Absent a search warrant, the Government may not turn a citizen s cell phone into a tracking device, the judgment notes adding adding that the Department of Justice seems to agree, since its internal policies now tell government agents to get a warrant before using such devices.

In the current case, the DEA used the cell site simulator to work out the location of a defendant, Raymond Lambis. In the following search of his apartment they found narcotics and drug paraphernalia , and it’s that evidence that Lambis has now had suppressed in the case. Citing the Kyllo decision, Judge Pauley writes that he does not wish to leave the homeowner at the mercy of advancing technology , and that if the Government uses a device that is not in general public use, to explore details of the home that would previously have been unknowable without physical intrusion, the surveillance is a search and is presumptively unreasonable without a warrant. In the current case, the decision finds that since pings from Lambi’s phone needed specialised technology to receive the cell site simulator it amounted to unreasonable search.

The judge also slaps the DEA for simple laziness: previous requests for warrants for cell phone data (such as carrier data about calls made and tower locations) in the case had been granted by magistrates, which suggests strongly that the Government could have obtained a warrant to use a cell-site simulator, if it had wished to do so .

Sponsored: Global DDoS threat landscape report5

References

  1. ^ Stingrays (www.eff.org)
  2. ^ ruled in 2015 (www.theregister.co.uk)
  3. ^ here (regmedia.co.uk)
  4. ^ Kyllo (www.theregister.co.uk)
  5. ^ Global DDoS threat landscape report (go.theregister.com)

US drug squads told to get a warrant before tracking mobile phones

A US federal judge in New York State has pushed back against Uncle Sam’s Drug Enforcement Agency’s use of Stingrays1, saying evidence collected by the fake phone masts isn’t admissible. A Maryland judge ruled in 20152 that investigators need court-approved warrants to set up pretend cellphone towers that track people by their mobiles. On Tuesday, US district court judge William Pauley III, sitting in New York, came to the same conclusion, declaring that the Stingray technology can’t be used to subvert America’s Fourth Amendment. His judgment, here3, draws parallels with other cases that have treated privacy-invasive technologies as unreasonable search. Past rulings on such matters have kiboshed heat detection through walls, for example, in the 15-year-old Kyllo4 case that began in 1992.

Absent a search warrant, the Government may not turn a citizen s cell phone into a tracking device, the judgment notes adding adding that the Department of Justice seems to agree, since its internal policies now tell government agents to get a warrant before using such devices.

In the current case, the DEA used the cell site simulator to work out the location of a defendant, Raymond Lambis. In the following search of his apartment they found narcotics and drug paraphernalia , and it’s that evidence that Lambis has now had suppressed in the case. Citing the Kyllo decision, Judge Pauley writes that he does not wish to leave the homeowner at the mercy of advancing technology , and that if the Government uses a device that is not in general public use, to explore details of the home that would previously have been unknowable without physical intrusion, the surveillance is a search and is presumptively unreasonable without a warrant. In the current case, the decision finds that since pings from Lambi’s phone needed specialised technology to receive the cell site simulator it amounted to unreasonable search.

The judge also slaps the DEA for simple laziness: previous requests for warrants for cell phone data (such as carrier data about calls made and tower locations) in the case had been granted by magistrates, which suggests strongly that the Government could have obtained a warrant to use a cell-site simulator, if it had wished to do so .

Sponsored: 2016 Cyberthreat defense report5

References

  1. ^ Stingrays (www.eff.org)
  2. ^ ruled in 2015 (www.theregister.co.uk)
  3. ^ here (regmedia.co.uk)
  4. ^ Kyllo (www.theregister.co.uk)
  5. ^ 2016 Cyberthreat defense report (go.theregister.com)

Panasonic NN-CS894 review

The Panasonic NN-CS894 combi microwave has a high official internal capacity of 32l; yet it’s not obviously taller or deeper than other, more compact microwave ovens. It helps that it looks good – its stainless steel casing and black glass front gives it a touch of class, which is reinforced by its hefty 21kg weight. The NN-CS894 is controlled using touch sensitive buttons and a slider alongside a large LCD screen. Although the buttons are labelled only with icons, I generally found them easier to interpret than the hieroglyphic riddles that pass for buttons on some models. As with many expensive models, the NN-CS894’s door is hinged at the bottom rather than on the left hand side – a move I applaud for ease of access, as hinged doors can be a pain if you’re coming from the left. Unlike most other microwaves, the NN-CS894 has a flatbed design too. The absence of a turntable combined with its cavernous interior means you can fit bigger dishes inside compared to microwaves that do have a turntable.

Panasonic NN-CS894 Review

However, this theoretical advantage is made moot by the NN-CS894 s surprisingly poor grilling and defrosting performance. After ten minutes under the grill, the only evidence of browning on a slice of white bread was a small patch of mild yellowing in the centre. The cost of this unattractive colouring was that the bread had started to curl from the heat. Other microwaves I ve seen have achieved far more pleasing levels of browning, without any curling, from similar grilling times or less. The NN-CS894 fared so badly in our defrosting test that I reran it just to be certain. The weight-based defrost program chose a defrost time of 5 minutes. Yet despite running this program three times, an oval-shaped chunk of still-frozen chicken flesh approximately 5cm in length was clearly evident in the test breast. The defrost program does flash onscreen prompts telling you to flip food over and how long to leave it standing for, but all that is for nought given its alarmingly bad defrosting performance. At least combi grilling worked well. It cooked a chicken breast through in eight minutes with only slight overcooking around the edges. It wasn t too loud either, managing a consistent reading of 55-57dB.

The NN-CS894 managed an average power output of 493W with the output rising reasonably steadily over the course of the test. Even so, a jacket potato was cooked surprisingly unevenly with the middle scorchingly hot at 94 degrees celsius compared to 78 and 75 degrees for the left and right hand edges respectively.

The Panasonic NN-CS894 does come with a handy array of extras. There s an enamel shelf, a grill rack and a glass shelf. Plus there s a plastic steam tray for use with the integrated steamer as well as a generously lengthy five year warranty. Even so, at 500 the NN-CS894 is just too expensive to recommend – especially considering its poor grilling and defrosting efforts. It’s a shame as Panasonic makes some great microwaves, this just isn’t one of them, for alternatives see our Best Microwaves 2016. Buy the Panasonic NN-CS894 now from John Lewis2
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Hardware Type – turntable or flatbed Flatbed Dimensions 387x488x470mm Dimensions with door open 387x488x715mm Weight 21kg Stated volume 32l Interior dimensions 220x407x225mm Turntable diameter N/A Door hinge location Bottom Stated power output 1000W Accessories Enamel shelf, wire shelf, glass shelf, steam tray Power and capacity Convection oven/grill Yes/Yes Steamer Yes Max countdown on timer 30min Controls type Touchsensitive buttons and slider Buying information Warranty Five years RTB Details www.panasonic.co.uk3 Part Code NN-CS894

References

  1. ^ Best Microwaves 2016 (www.expertreviews.co.uk)
  2. ^ Buy the Panasonic NN-CS894 now from John Lewis (www.johnlewis.com)
  3. ^ www.panasonic.co.uk (www.panasonic.co.uk)
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