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mobile-phone

Global smartphone sales on the rise

347 million smartphones were bought globally from the beginning of April until the end of June this year, according to market research firm GfK. This makes 2017’s second quarter the most successful ever for global smartphone sales, up by 4% from 2016’s figures. Emerging Asia (which includes Bangladesh and Malaysia), Central and Eastern Europe, and Latin America have led this growth – with respective demand increases of 13%, 11% and 10%.

However, Great Britain has seen a demand decline of 5% compared to 2016’s second quarter figures. GfK states that this is due to saturation – that is, lots of people already own a smartphone. These findings are based on data collected by GfK for April and May, and June estimates based on weekly data up to 24 June 2017.

Best Buy mobile phones[1] – discover the best smartphones you can buy

Are smartphones getting more expensive?

According to GfK, the global smartphone market value has also grown, up 9% from last year’s second quarter. The market research company points to rising smartphone prices to explain this increase.

This is unlikely to raise any eyebrows. You need only look at the flagship smartphone releases to see that they’re getting more expensive. For instance, the Samsung Galaxy S8[2] – arguably the biggest smartphone release of 2017 so far, costs an eye-watering ?689 to buy outright.

Its predecessor, the Samsung Galaxy S7[3], cost around ?569 when it was first released. Similarly, last year’s OnePlus 3T[4] cost ?399 upon release. Whereas the new OnePlus 5[5] will set you back by ?449.

Smartphone prices continue to rise, and we’re interested to see whether and when it plateaus. But, more importantly, do you get better quality for your money? Our mobile phone reviews[6] will help you decide.

Should I buy a cheap mobile phone?

While smartphones are generally getting more expensive, there are still some great cheaper options to be snagged.

We’ve found a few Best Buy smartphones that cost less than ?200, and even more if you’re happy to stretch your budget to ?300.

We ignore price when we test smartphones, which is why you can trust our reviews to give you honest, impartial direction.

Head to our best cheap mobile phones[7] for a great quality smartphone on a budget, or browse our simple phone reviews[8] for models that cost as little as ?5.

References

  1. ^ Best Buy mobile phones (www.which.co.uk)
  2. ^ Samsung Galaxy S8 (www.which.co.uk)
  3. ^ Samsung Galaxy S7 (www.which.co.uk)
  4. ^ OnePlus 3T (www.which.co.uk)
  5. ^ OnePlus 5 (www.which.co.uk)
  6. ^ mobile phone reviews (www.which.co.uk)
  7. ^ best cheap mobile phones (www.which.co.uk)
  8. ^ simple phone reviews (www.which.co.uk)

Which? tries out OnePlus 5 smartphone

We’ve got our hands on the OnePlus 5 mobile phone, to give you our expert first impressions ahead of our full test results. The OnePlus 5 is the latest of the Chinese company’s popular line of smartphones. While OnePlus may not be as well-known as Apple and Samsung, it’s making its mark with high-end smartphones that can compete on paper, yet undercut on price.

This new smartphone has a few features that firmly place it in the higher end of the market, such as a dual rear camera, fast-charging technology and up to 128GB of storage. But does this actually add up to a great quality smartphone, or is it just marketing mumbo jumbo? Head to our OnePlus 5 first look review[1] for our initial impressions, or keep reading for an overview of some of its mouth-watering specs.

Mobile phone reviews[2] – check out our reviews of more than 100 smartphones to make the wisest choice with your cash.

Design

There’s little doubt about it: mobile phones are getting bigger and bigger. The OnePlus 5 is no exception.

It has a palm-stretching 5.5-inch display – about the same size as the Apple iPhone 7 Plus[3] and Google Pixel XL[4]. One of the most talked-about features of the Samsung Galaxy S8[5] is its very narrow bezels at the top and bottom of the display. If you’re not a fan of this design, you’ll be glad to hear that the OnePlus 5 doesn’t follow the trend.

It has a non-tactile home button. That is, you touch it rather than press it – and you miss out on a satisfying click. This might be initially disconcerting if you’re used to a clickable home button, but we think it’s something you’ll get used to.

This button also works as the OnePlus 5’s fingerprint scanner.

Camera

Dual rear cameras are becoming more and more popular with smartphones. The OnePlus 5 joins the party, boasting a 16Mp sensor and 20Mp telephoto lens, along with a 16Mp selfie camera on the back. The theory is that you’ll be able to zoom more quickly and easily, and without seeing a drop in quality.

Head to our OnePlus 5 first look review[6] to find out whether our expert thought this phone takes convincing shots in normal- and low-light conditions. And when the full results of the OnePlus 5 come in, we’ll see just how well its camera stacks up against the competition.

Battery

The OnePlus 5 has a 3,300mAh battery, compared to the OnePlus 3T’s 3,400mAh offering.

However, battery life isn’t determined purely by battery size – it depends on other factors too, such as processor efficiency. The new phone also comes with fast-charging technology, promising 60% charge in just thirty minutes. We’re looking forward to putting the OnePlus 5 through its paces in our battery life tests, to find out whether it delivers on it claims.

If you’re interested in how much stamina the 5’s predecessor offers before running out of battery, head to our OnePlus 3T review[7].

References

  1. ^ OnePlus 5 first look review (www.which.co.uk)
  2. ^ Mobile phone reviews (www.which.co.uk)
  3. ^ Apple iPhone 7 Plus (www.which.co.uk)
  4. ^ Google Pixel XL (www.which.co.uk)
  5. ^ Samsung Galaxy S8 (www.which.co.uk)
  6. ^ OnePlus 5 first look review (www.which.co.uk)
  7. ^ OnePlus 3T review (www.which.co.uk)

Should you spend £5 on a mobile phone?

We’ve tested and rated nine new simple mobile phones that cost from as little as ?5 to more than ?100 – but which is the best? With many people spending more than ?500 on the latest smartphone, it’s somewhat shocking and refreshing to see a phone that costs ?5, such as the MobiWire Ayasha[1]. It’s unusual to find a mobile that costs about the same as a box of washing powder.

The cheap MobiWire Ayasha is fairly basic, but might be a good choice if you’re looking for a phone in case of an emergency. It also has a few handy extras, including an in-built FM radio, a torch and a 0.3Mp rear camera. The most expensive simple mobile phone in our latest test costs more than ?100.

The Doro 6530[2] has a large 2.8-inch display, a 2Mp camera, and 3G internet connectivity – so you should be able to browse the internet fairly quickly. It’s also hearing-aid compatible and has an SOS button on the back. Pressing this sends a message to your pre-assigned contacts, to let them know you might need some help.

But which has a longer-lasting battery, and which is easiest to use? Spending more might get you more features, but it doesn’t guarantee you a better simple mobile phone. Our tests often find no direct link between price and quality, so make sure you read our reviews before you buy.

Simple mobile phone reviews[3] – get the best for your budget

Just in: new simple mobile phone reviews

Click on the links below to read individual reviews of the latest simple mobile phones we’ve tested. Models are listed in alphabetical order. Prices are correct as of 11 July 2017, and are subject to change.

Candy bar vs clamshell design

If you’re looking for a new simple mobile phone, one of the first choices you have to make is whether you want a candy bar or clamshell design. Clamshell mobiles are often referred to as ‘flip phones’ – you can open and close the phone’s lid to reveal or hide the display. Candy-bar phones have no such lid, and the keypad and display are on the same surface.

Candy-bar phones are typically very small and compact, so they’ll take up little space in your bag. As flip phones have the display on the lid, rather than the main body of the phone, there’s often more space for larger and better-spaced buttons. For more advice on what to look for when choosing your next phone, head to our guide on how to buy the best simple mobile phone[4].

Nokia 3310 first look review

Nokia has relaunched its famous 3310, first released in 2000. The original model garnered a reputation for exceptional battery life and for being sturdy. The announcement of the revamped Nokia 3310 has turned into one of the most-discussed mobile phone launches of 2017 so far.

We’ve got our hands on the 2017 model to bring you our full Nokia 3310 first look review[5], where we cover how simple we think it is to use, and whether we think it’s worth buying.

References

  1. ^ MobiWire Ayasha (www.which.co.uk)
  2. ^ Doro 6530 (www.which.co.uk)
  3. ^ Simple mobile phone reviews (www.which.co.uk)
  4. ^ how to buy the best simple mobile phone (www.which.co.uk)
  5. ^ Nokia 3310 first look review (www.which.co.uk)

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