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EXIU Baby Boys Girls Animal Pattern Harem Pants Trousers Leggings 0-2Y – Cheap

Condition:100% New and high quality Material: Cotton Blend Color: Multi-colored, as the picture shows Style: Animal Pattern Leggings Harem PP Pants Trousers Outfits Size: XS S M L XL, Fits 0-24 Months Baby

Size Chart Size— Pants —- Waist*2 —- Age Recommended XS —41cm/16.14″ —- 18cm/7.08″ —- 0-6M M —-45cm/17.71″ —- 20cm/7.87″ —- 6-12M L —- 49cm/19.29″ —- 22cm/8.66″ —- 12-18M XL —53cm/20.86″ —- 24cm/9.44″ —- 18-24M Package Include: 1X Baby PP Pants

  • Size: XS S M L XL, Fits 0-24 Months Baby
  • Cute Animal Pattern Leggings; Baby Boys Girls Cute Cartoon Print Hat + Scarf carves
  • Comfortable Cotton Material,100% Brand new and high quality.
  • Perfect for Newborn baby wear, also can be a sleeping pants
  • Package Include:1 x Baby PP Pants/1x Baby Hat + Scarf carves

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The latest on Facebook’s data scandal: lawsuits, calls to quit, and whistleblowers ignored

And all the while the firm’s CEO remains hugely conspicuous by his absence. Backstory: In case you missed it, Facebook is embroiled in a huge scandal because of the way its users’ data was shared with Cambridge Analytica, a firm that provided data to the Trump election campaign in 2016. Overlooked whistleblowers: Ex-Facebook staffer Sandy Parakilas told British politicians today that his warnings about the firm’s lax data protection standards were ignored, and that some of the executives he told still work at the social network.

To this point, today’s Bloomberg Businessweek cover story makes a compelling argument: maybe we need a Data Protection Agency? The legal backlash begins: It was only a matter of time, but the first legal complaints against Facebook and Cambridge Analytica have now been filed. Expect more to follow in the coming days.

#DeleteFacebook: Brian Acton, the cofounder of WhatsApp (who made billions by selling his startup to, ahem, Facebook in 2014), has been a very vocal part of a campaign urging people to quit the social network. “It is time. #deletefacebook,” he tweeted. (Or you could manipulate Facebook instead of letting it manipulate you.) Where’s Zuck? The CEO was a no-show at a staff meeting yesterday. The Daily Beast says he’s “working around the clock.” The American and British governments want him to give evidence, but he sent “mid-level staffers” to testify to Congress today.

Maybe here’s Zuck: The Verge says he’s expected to make an appearance at a company Q&A on Friday. Meanwhile Axios reports that the CEO will speak out about the scandal “in the next 24 hours.” So expect to hear from his some time this week. We guess.

Lots to lose: Media analysts say that Facebook has made a huge mess of handling the situation so far. (See: the firm’s stock price.) When Zuck does speak out, he will need to tread carefully–more mistakes could be damaging, to both reputation and bottom line.

Is it different this time? Every Facebook scandal feels like the one that’s going to bring about radical change, but it hasn’t–yet. Gadfly proposes that Facebook is bigger, and lawmakers more suspicious, than ever this time, so it could be different.

But that’s a very big “could.”

Image credit:

  • Facebook / Jamie Condliffe