Product Promotion Network

Samsung profits looking up ahead of huge new phone launch later this week

The world s largest mobile phone and TV maker expects to make an operating profit of 5.9 trillion won ( 3.65bn) for the first three months of the year, a fall of more than 30% compared to last year s figure and Samsung s sixth consecutive quarterly decline.

Despite the big drop, the figure is above analysts forecasts for the technology giant, which has been struggling with competition in its home market from the likes of Apple and Xiaomi.

The company hopes that its new phone, the S6, is enough to put it back on top against the iPhone.

The phone brings many features that have been lacking in recent versions of its flagship handset, and The Independent‘s review said that it was now the best Android phone around1.

The company has been seeking to improve its TV offerings, too, including releasing the first one with a curved screen.

References

  1. ^ now the best Android phone around (www.independent.co.uk)

LG Takes a Dig at Samsung and Its Galaxy S6 Edge ‘Bendgate’ Controversy

After the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge ‘bendgate’ controversy1 began last week, followed by the denial2 of any fragility by Samsung with its own 3-point bend test earlier this week, LG on Monday mocked its Korean-competitor with an image of the LG G Flex2 on Twitter.

LG Jordan on Monday tweeted a poster of the curved display G Flex2 smartphone on Twitter teasing Samsung3 for its recently discovered ‘bendgate’ issue with Galaxy S6 Edge4. The tweet5 reads, “Some curves just make sense. #bendgate”. The image caption adds, “LG G Flex26, takes the ‘edge’ off.”

To remind you, last week SquareTrade posted a video showing the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge being put through a bend test alongside the iPhone 6 Plus7 and HTC One M98.

The video showed that the Galaxy S6 Edge bends as much iPhone 6 Plus – with which the bendgate originally started9. The approximately 2-minute video also shows HTC’s new flagship put through a bend test.

According to SquareTrade, the iPhone 6 Plus started bending when 110 pounds of pressure was applied. It reached its breaking point at 179 pounds of pressure.

The HTC One M9 bent at 120 pounds of pressure, and that was also its breaking point.

The Galaxy S6 Edge, like the iPhone 6 Plus, bent at 110 pounds of pressure. The dual-edge display sporting smartphone’s screen cracked at this point, which was not the case for the iPhone 6 Plus. Even with a broken display, the Galaxy S6 Edge worked, and the phone finally broke at 140 pounds of pressure.

Defending the product, Samsung on Monday posted its own 3-point bend test video showcasing that both the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge can handle pressure of up to 79lbf (pound force, which translates to 35.8 kgf or kilogram force) without bending, more than the pressure an average human could exert when sitting on the phone in their back pocket, and even shows that both the panels (front and rear) were subjected to the test.

Pointing out to SquareTrade that both panels need to be tested, a tweet by Samsung Tomorrow also noted, “When you #bendtest, it is important that you check both front AND back GalaxyS6edge.”

The infamous ‘bendgate’ issue hearkens back to the launch of the iPhone 6 Plus.

It started when users started complaining that the phone was bending in their pockets while sitting. Soon after YouTube videos thrived, showing other flagships put under similar bend tests to see whether they will bend similar to iPhone 6 Plus. At that point, Samsung and numerous other manufacturers took pot shots at Apple with viral memes.

Apple later defended the build quality and testing method of both the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, taking media on a tour of its testing facility.

References

  1. ^ Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge ‘bendgate’ controversy (gadgets.ndtv.com)
  2. ^ denial (gadgets.ndtv.com)
  3. ^ Samsung (gadgets.ndtv.com)
  4. ^ Galaxy S6 Edge (gadgets.ndtv.com)
  5. ^ tweet (twitter.com)
  6. ^ LG G Flex2 (gadgets.ndtv.com)
  7. ^ iPhone 6 Plus (gadgets.ndtv.com)
  8. ^ HTC One M9 (gadgets.ndtv.com)
  9. ^ bendgate originally started (gadgets.ndtv.com)

Survey tells us what Africans do with their phones

PEOPLE speak about Africa as “the mobile continent” so frequently that it has become a clich . People throw the phrase around as if it explains everything, without interrogating what Africans do with their mobile devices.

One attempt to change that comes courtesy of technology research outfit World Wide Worx, which has published the results of its survey of 3,500 mobile phone users in five of Africa s major markets SA, Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana and Uganda.

The survey reveals unsurprisingly that there has been a rise of internet access via phones, the potential demise of Nokia and, a little more surprisingly, the continued appeal of BlackBerry.

According to World Wide Worx, internet browsing via phones now stands at 40% across all five markets, with 51% of respondents in Ghana and 47% in Nigeria reporting that they use their phones to access the internet. SA lags behind at 40% and Kenya (34%) and Uganda (29%) are slowest on the uptake.

Despite a smaller percentage of its people using their mobile devices to access the internet, South Africans lead the way when it comes to app downloads, suggesting higher levels of smartphone ownership.

Thirty-four percent of the South African phone users surveyed make downloads from app stores. This compares to 31% in Ghana, 28% in Nigeria, 19% in Kenya and 18% in Uganda.

World Wide Worx MD Arthur Goldstuck said this number may could be an indication of better and more stable mobile broadband infrastructure in SA “despite anecdotal reports of the internet being used more actively in Nigeria and Kenya”.

“Internet use is far greater in some of these countries in terms of number of people,” he said, “but substantially lower in terms of intensity of use.”

Facebook and sending SMSs are the most popular activities most popular activities among African mobile users.

The survey also confirms a widely held view that Nokia remains the single biggest phone brand in the major African markets. That said, its market share is dwindling.

Almost half of respondents 46% reported owning a Nokia as their previous phone, only 34% own one now.

And only half of those 18% intend buying a Nokia next. The big winner is Samsung, which is currently owned by 17% of respondents, up marginally from 14% ownership previously. When asked what phone will be bought next, the Samsung proportion shot up to 26% more than a quarter of phone users.

However, the most surprising finding from the survey may have been that BlackBerry, which has held steady at 6% penetration for current and previous phones, is expected to rise to 16%.

While this flies in the face of international trends, it reveals a hidden dynamic of the aspirations of new smartphone users.

Matt Angus-Hammond, business development lead for GeoPoll in southern Africa, explains one reason for the possible surge in BlackBerry adoption: “BlackBerry introduced most of Africa to the idea of a smartphone, and for the first few years was the flagship brand for the category. They initially hit the market through companies who got contracts for their executives, but as new models were introduced the old BlackBerrys have entered the mass market, and are still regarded as a status symbol in much of Africa.”

The hand-me-down effect suggests BlackBerry will retain its position as the third most popular phone brand in major African markets for now. However, brands that will challenge both BlackBerry and Nokia in the near future include Apple (2% currently, expected to rise to 11%), Huawei (3%, expected to go to 9%), Sony (2% to 5%) and LG (3% to 5%).

Current phone usage varies dramatically by country, with Nokia dominance ranging from 43% in Nigeria, 36% in SA and 34% in Uganda to 32% in Kenya and 28% in Ghana.

In each of the five countries, however, the data show it will drop to below 25% when the next phone is acquired, with Kenya least loyal to the brand: only 14% of Kenyans surveyed say they expect to buy a Nokia as their next phone.

Samsung finds its strongest current markets in Ghana (29%) and SA (21%), but is expected to rise in most other countries when the next phone is purchased. While it will remain at a similar level in SA and Ghana, it will rise from 18% to 39% in Kenya, and to 28% in Uganda, where it currently stands at only 10%. Nigeria market share will double, from 8% to 16%.

Apple is the surprise challenger for third place, with 16% of respondents in Ghana, 15% of Nigerians and 14% of South Africans indicating they would buy one next.

Uganda at 8% and Kenya at 5% also show surprisingly strong intentions to buy the high-cost iPhone next.

In all these cases though, a strong caveat needs to be added: intent to purchase and ability to purchase are two very different things. You may, for instance, intend to buy a luxury German sedan as your next car. Your economic circumstances may, however, force you into buying a more affordable hatchback.

The data collected in the survey tend to contradict formal retail data, as these questions ask about future purchases from those who are not yet in the market for a new phone.

The survey was conducted through GeoPoll s SMS survey platform, and the sample size of 700 per country gives a margin of error of 3.7% for each country.

“By reaching respondents across Africa through the mobile phone, GeoPoll is able to provide consumer data faster than ever before, and … we can collect data around intended purchases and brand affinity which is not represented by straightforward retail data” Mr Angus-Hammond explains.

Memeburn.com1

There is research to suggest that cellular phones, including smartphone devices, emit potentially cancer-causing radiation.

Picture: THINKSTOCK

PEOPLE speak about Africa as “the mobile continent” so frequently that it has become a clich . People throw the phrase around as if it explains everything, without interrogating what Africans do with their mobile devices.

One attempt to change that comes courtesy of technology research outfit World Wide Worx, which has published the results of its survey of 3,500 mobile phone users in five of Africa s major markets SA, Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana and Uganda.

The survey reveals unsurprisingly that there has been a rise of internet access via phones, the potential demise of Nokia and, a little more surprisingly, the continued appeal of BlackBerry.

According to World Wide Worx, internet browsing via phones now stands at 40% across all five markets, with 51% of respondents in Ghana and 47% in Nigeria reporting that they use their phones to access the internet. SA lags behind at 40% and Kenya (34%) and Uganda (29%) are slowest on the uptake.

Despite a smaller percentage of its people using their mobile devices to access the internet, South Africans lead the way when it comes to app downloads, suggesting higher levels of smartphone ownership.

Thirty-four percent of the South African phone users surveyed make downloads from app stores. This compares to 31% in Ghana, 28% in Nigeria, 19% in Kenya and 18% in Uganda.

World Wide Worx MD Arthur Goldstuck said this number may could be an indication of better and more stable mobile broadband infrastructure in SA “despite anecdotal reports of the internet being used more actively in Nigeria and Kenya”.

“Internet use is far greater in some of these countries in terms of number of people,” he said, “but substantially lower in terms of intensity of use.”

Facebook and sending SMSs are the most popular activities most popular activities among African mobile users.

The survey also confirms a widely held view that Nokia remains the single biggest phone brand in the major African markets. That said, its market share is dwindling.

Almost half of respondents 46% reported owning a Nokia as their previous phone, only 34% own one now.

And only half of those 18% intend buying a Nokia next. The big winner is Samsung, which is currently owned by 17% of respondents, up marginally from 14% ownership previously. When asked what phone will be bought next, the Samsung proportion shot up to 26% more than a quarter of phone users.

However, the most surprising finding from the survey may have been that BlackBerry, which has held steady at 6% penetration for current and previous phones, is expected to rise to 16%.

While this flies in the face of international trends, it reveals a hidden dynamic of the aspirations of new smartphone users.

Matt Angus-Hammond, business development lead for GeoPoll in southern Africa, explains one reason for the possible surge in BlackBerry adoption: “BlackBerry introduced most of Africa to the idea of a smartphone, and for the first few years was the flagship brand for the category. They initially hit the market through companies who got contracts for their executives, but as new models were introduced the old BlackBerrys have entered the mass market, and are still regarded as a status symbol in much of Africa.”

The hand-me-down effect suggests BlackBerry will retain its position as the third most popular phone brand in major African markets for now. However, brands that will challenge both BlackBerry and Nokia in the near future include Apple (2% currently, expected to rise to 11%), Huawei (3%, expected to go to 9%), Sony (2% to 5%) and LG (3% to 5%).

Current phone usage varies dramatically by country, with Nokia dominance ranging from 43% in Nigeria, 36% in SA and 34% in Uganda to 32% in Kenya and 28% in Ghana.

In each of the five countries, however, the data show it will drop to below 25% when the next phone is acquired, with Kenya least loyal to the brand: only 14% of Kenyans surveyed say they expect to buy a Nokia as their next phone.

Samsung finds its strongest current markets in Ghana (29%) and SA (21%), but is expected to rise in most other countries when the next phone is purchased. While it will remain at a similar level in SA and Ghana, it will rise from 18% to 39% in Kenya, and to 28% in Uganda, where it currently stands at only 10%. Nigeria market share will double, from 8% to 16%.

Apple is the surprise challenger for third place, with 16% of respondents in Ghana, 15% of Nigerians and 14% of South Africans indicating they would buy one next.

Uganda at 8% and Kenya at 5% also show surprisingly strong intentions to buy the high-cost iPhone next.

In all these cases though, a strong caveat needs to be added: intent to purchase and ability to purchase are two very different things. You may, for instance, intend to buy a luxury German sedan as your next car. Your economic circumstances may, however, force you into buying a more affordable hatchback.

The data collected in the survey tend to contradict formal retail data, as these questions ask about future purchases from those who are not yet in the market for a new phone.

The survey was conducted through GeoPoll s SMS survey platform, and the sample size of 700 per country gives a margin of error of 3.7% for each country.

“By reaching respondents across Africa through the mobile phone, GeoPoll is able to provide consumer data faster than ever before, and …

we can collect data around intended purchases and brand affinity which is not represented by straightforward retail data” Mr Angus-Hammond explains.

Memeburn.com2

References

  1. ^ Memeburn.com (memeburn.com)
  2. ^ Memeburn.com (memeburn.com)