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PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is now on mobile in the US

PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is now available on mobile in the US, on both iOS and Android. The game has already been live in Asia for quite a while and came to Canada last week, but there wasn’t a launch date for the US.

The US release might have been sped up by Fortnite Battle Royale launching on mobile, another battle royale-style game that takes PUBG‘s core design and packages it up with better-looking graphics and some gameplay tweaks that have led to it breaking streaming records on Twitch.

The mobile version of PUBG was developed by Tencent, the Chinese conglomerate that owns WeChat and invests in games like League of Legends. The mobile PUBG is true to the full game, although the graphics have been pared down for mobile performance.

You also are limited to the single original map, but you’re still in for lengthy rounds of gameplay, which is sure to drain phone battery.

The US Navy’s newest submarine comes with an Xbox controller

On Saturday, the USS Colorado, the US Navy’s latest Virginia-class attack submarine, went into service from the Naval Submarine Base New London in Connecticut. It comes with an unconventional piece of equipment: an XBox controller, according to USA Today.

The Navy said in September that the new submarines would come equipped with a pair of photonics masts, which replace the previously-used periscope. The masts feature high-resolution cameras that can rotate 360 degrees and feeds their imagery to monitors in the ship’s control room.

Initially, the masts were controlled with a “helicopter-style stick,” but those were described as heavy and clunky, and were swapped out with an Xbox 360 controller.

According to the Colorado’s commanding officer, Commander Reed Koepp, using off-the-shelf technology saves the Navy money, while the controller is already intuitive for the submarine’s sailors.

The Navy isn’t the first to adapt their controls to what their users are familiar with. Wired for War author P.W.

Singer told PBS in 2009 that the military has taken cues from the video game industry, with controllers that closely mimic the ones that control consoles: “we already have this generation that’s already trained up in their use.

So why would we try to use different systems that we’d have to train them how to utilize?”

L’Oreal acquires Modiface, a major AR beauty company

L’Oreal announced today that it has acquired Modiface, a company that’s had a hand in the creation of many custom augmented reality beauty apps, including those from Sephora and Estee Lauder. L’Oreal didn’t disclose the amount spent, but it did tell Reuters that it now owns Modiface’s numerous patents that help users visualize makeup and hairstyles on themselves. The partnership makes sense in that Modiface has already worked with L’Oreal multiple times, including on the launch of its Style My Hair mobile app, which lets users try on different hairstyles.

For that app, Modiface manually annotated 22,000 facial images to create the experience.

AR has become an important part of the beauty industry. Meitu, a China-based company with an AR makeup app, is worth billions of dollars. Multiple brands have launched AR tools, and it’s easy to imagine the apps coming in handy when smart mirrors eventually become a thing.

L’Oreal has launched multiple gadgets, too, like a UV nail sensor at CES this year.

Given that many of these makeup companies have relied on Modiface to launch their AR apps, the acquisition gives L’Oreal a major leg up on its competitors who will now have to find another company that’s thinking about AR beauty.

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